Uric Acid

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Latest Edit: Hector 2014-3-21 (EDT)

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Uric acid is produced mainly in the liver. It is a nitrogenous compound that is the final product in the breakdown of purine. Although most uric acid is derived from the metabolism of endogenous purine, eating foods rich in purines contributes to the total pool of uric acid.[1] Seventy-five percent of uric acid is excreted through the kidneys, and twenty-five is excreted through the intestinal tract. The excretion of uric acid depends on the uric acid levels in the blood, combined with glomerular filtration and tubular secretion of uric acid into the urine. Elevated levels of uric acid can cause nephrolithiasis and ureterolithiasis.[2], [3]


Contents

Discussion

  • Uric acid levels can be measured in both blood and urine.
  • Although most uric acid is derived from the metabolism of endogenous purine, eating foods rich in purines contributes to the total pool of uric acid.[1]

Patient Preparation

  • No special diet is required.
  • Factors which can cause increased levels:
  • Recent use of radiographic contrast agents
  • Factors which can cause decreased levels:
  • Alcohol, anti-inflammatory preparations, salicylates, thiazide diuretics, Vitamin C, and warfarin

Clinical Implications

Ranges: The following are the reference ranges for this lab. However, lab ranges can vary by laboratory and country. [3]

Standard U.S. Units (mg/dL) Standard International Units (umol/L)
Conventional Laboratory Range 2.2 - 7.7 131 - 458
Optimal Range Males: 3.5 - 5.9 / Females: 3.0 - 5.5 Males: 208 - 351 / Females: 178 - 327
Alarm Ranges < 2.0 or > 9.0 < 119 or > 535

High levels indicate:

Low levels indicate:

Associated Tests

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Schlesinger N (2005) Dietary factors and hyperuricaemia. Curr Pharm Des;Vol.11(32):4133-8.
  2. Pagana Kathleen D, Pagana Timothy J (2006) Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, Mosby.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Weatherby Dicken, Ferguson Scott (2002) Blood Chemistry and CBC Analysis: Clinical Laboratory Testing from a Functional Perspective, Bear Mountain
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