Nausea and/or Vomiting

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Latest Edit: Hector 2014-4-10 (EDT)

Nausea and/or Vomiting
Nausea.jpg

Nausea and/or Vomiting
Causes Food Reactions, Infections, Alcohol, Stress, Environmental Toxins
See Also Digestive Conditions, Alcoholism, Heartburn, Otitis media, Migraine, Kidney Stones, Peptic Ulcer
Books Books on Digestive and Liver Conditions
Articles Articles on Digestive Conditions

Nausea is a vague, unpleasant sensation in the upper abdomen. Vomiting refers to the forceful expulsion of gastric contents through the mouth.[1] Nausea and vomiting may be an acute and appropriate response to foreign or harmful pathogens or it may indicate a more severe underlying condition.

Contents

Naturopathic Assessment

Causal Factors

In order to stimulate the innate ability of the body to heal the causes of disease must be identified and addressed. The most common cause of nausea and/or vomiting is gastritis, yet there are other conditions and factors that can cause these symptoms.

Lifestyle

  • Food allergies and food sensitivities can cause nausea.
  • Fatty foods can contribute to nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Nausea and/or vomiting may be a reaction to eating too much or eating too quickly.
  • A normal response of the body to bad or spoiled food is often vomiting. In this case the vomiting is part of the normal elimination of toxins process of the body.
  • Excessive alcohol ingestion commonly causes nausea and/or vomiting.

Social

  • Recurrent nausea that occurs without vomiting can occur in response to emotional stress.

Environmental

  • The most common cause of acute nausea and vomiting is gastric infection gastritis, often referred to a stomach flu or food poisoning. Nausea and/or vomiting associated with food poisoning typically resolves within 24 to 48 hours.
  • Many different infections, whether viral, bacterial or parasitic can result in nausea and vomiting.

Medical Interventions

  • Prescription Medications
  • Many prescription medications can cause nausea and/or vomiting including codeine, digitalis, glycosides, quinidine, salicylates, theophylline, chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, cytotoxic drugs, antihypertensives, NSAIDs, nicotine.[1]
  • Medical Treatments
  • Medical treatments such as radiation treatments can cause nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Supplements
  • Some supplements such as iron or B vitamins can cause nausea in some individuals, especially if taken on an empty stomach.

Diagnostic Testing

The diagnostic testing required is based on the suspected causes and triggers. Some of the common diagnostic testing for recurring or severe nausea include:[1]

  • Blood tests such as a CBC to rule out infection, serum drug levels to assess for reaction to medications, Creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, pregnancy test, and amylase
  • Imaging Studies
  • Gastroscopy, radiograph of the abdomen, ultrasonography, esophageal radiograph endoscopy, CT scan of the pancreas, neurological examination and CT scan.

Related Symptoms and Conditions

Conditions that have nausea and/or vomiting as a symptom include:

Rare, but serious conditions that may have nausea and/or vomiting as a symptom include:

Characteristics

The nature of the nausea and vomiting is a key guide to the cause or associated condition. Nausea can be:

  • either acute or chronic,
  • typically occurs either in the morning or after eating
  • mild or projectile
  • painful or painless

The symptoms that can be associated include:

Naturopathic Treatment

The goal of naturopathic treatment is to support and work in tandem with the healing power of the body and to address the causal factors of disease with individual treatment strategies. Once the cause of the nausea and/or vomiting and whether it is acute or chronic has been established the appropriate treatment plan can be determined. It is important not to suppress nausea or vomiting is the cause is food poisoning.

It is always advisable to work with a naturopathic doctor before engaging in any treatment plan.

Home Care

  • Lying down may help some causes of nausea such as motion sickness.

Lifestyle

Lifestyle recommendations include:

  • It is important to ensure that you drink enough water and other clear liquids. Electrolyte replacement may be required. Coconut water, chicken broth, tomato juice and the juice of boiled vegetables can provide needed electrolytes.
  • Exercise such as walking may help alleviate nausea and/or vomiting, whereas other exercises such as running, jogging or lifting weights may actually make it worse.
  • Addressing postural concerns, especially those affecting the mid-back may help in alleviating nausea.


Latest Edit: Hector 2014-4-10 (EDT)

Nausea and/or Vomiting
Nausea.jpg

Nausea and/or Vomiting
Causes Food Reactions, Infections, Alcohol, Stress, Environmental Toxins
See Also Digestive Conditions, Alcoholism, Heartburn, Otitis media, Migraine, Kidney Stones, Peptic Ulcer
Books Books on Digestive and Liver Conditions
Articles Articles on Digestive Conditions

Nausea is a vague, unpleasant sensation in the upper abdomen. Vomiting refers to the forceful expulsion of gastric contents through the mouth.[1] Nausea and vomiting may be an acute and appropriate response to foreign or harmful pathogens or it may indicate a more severe underlying condition.

Naturopathic Assessment

Causal Factors

In order to stimulate the innate ability of the body to heal the causes of disease must be identified and addressed. The most common cause of nausea and/or vomiting is gastritis, yet there are other conditions and factors that can cause these symptoms.

Lifestyle

  • Food allergies and food sensitivities can cause nausea.
  • Fatty foods can contribute to nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Nausea and/or vomiting may be a reaction to eating too much or eating too quickly.
  • A normal response of the body to bad or spoiled food is often vomiting. In this case the vomiting is part of the normal elimination of toxins process of the body.
  • Excessive alcohol ingestion commonly causes nausea and/or vomiting.

Social

  • Recurrent nausea that occurs without vomiting can occur in response to emotional stress.

Environmental

  • The most common cause of acute nausea and vomiting is gastric infection gastritis, often referred to a stomach flu or food poisoning. Nausea and/or vomiting associated with food poisoning typically resolves within 24 to 48 hours.
  • Many different infections, whether viral, bacterial or parasitic can result in nausea and vomiting.

Medical Interventions

  • Prescription Medications
  • Many prescription medications can cause nausea and/or vomiting including codeine, digitalis, glycosides, quinidine, salicylates, theophylline, chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, cytotoxic drugs, antihypertensives, NSAIDs, nicotine.[1]
  • Medical Treatments
  • Medical treatments such as radiation treatments can cause nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Supplements
  • Some supplements such as iron or B vitamins can cause nausea in some individuals, especially if taken on an empty stomach.

Diagnostic Testing

The diagnostic testing required is based on the suspected causes and triggers. Some of the common diagnostic testing for recurring or severe nausea include:[1]

  • Blood tests such as a CBC to rule out infection, serum drug levels to assess for reaction to medications, Creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, pregnancy test, and amylase
  • Imaging Studies
  • Gastroscopy, radiograph of the abdomen, ultrasonography, esophageal radiograph endoscopy, CT scan of the pancreas, neurological examination and CT scan.

Related Symptoms and Conditions

Conditions that have nausea and/or vomiting as a symptom include:

Rare, but serious conditions that may have nausea and/or vomiting as a symptom include:

Characteristics

The nature of the nausea and vomiting is a key guide to the cause or associated condition. Nausea can be:

  • either acute or chronic,
  • typically occurs either in the morning or after eating
  • mild or projectile
  • painful or painless

The symptoms that can be associated include:

Naturopathic Treatment

The goal of naturopathic treatment is to support and work in tandem with the healing power of the body and to address the causal factors of disease with individual treatment strategies. Once the cause of the nausea and/or vomiting and whether it is acute or chronic has been established the appropriate treatment plan can be determined. It is important not to suppress nausea or vomiting is the cause is food poisoning.

It is always advisable to work with a naturopathic doctor before engaging in any treatment plan.

Home Care

  • Lying down may help some causes of nausea such as motion sickness.

Lifestyle

Lifestyle recommendations include:

  • It is important to ensure that you drink enough water and other clear liquids. Electrolyte replacement may be required. Coconut water, chicken broth, tomato juice and the juice of boiled vegetables can provide needed electrolytes.
  • Exercise such as walking may help alleviate nausea and/or vomiting, whereas other exercises such as running, jogging or lifting weights may actually make it worse.
  • Addressing postural concerns, especially those affecting the mid-back may help in alleviating nausea.

Naturopathic Therapies

The prescribing of naturopathic therapies requires the guidance of a naturopathic doctor as it depends on a number of factors including the causal factors, a person's age, prescription medications, other conditions and symptoms and overall health. It is always advisable to work with a naturopathic doctor prior to taking any natural therapies.

Naturopathic Therapies for nausea and vomiting include:

References

Reviewed by Iva Lloyd, BScH, RPE, ND [1]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Seller Robert (2000) Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints, 4th edition W.B. Saunders Company.
  2. Lu Henry (1986) Chinese System of Food Cures, prevention and remedies Sterling Publishing Co. New York.
  3. Godfrey Anthony, Saunders Paul Richard, Barlow Kerry, Gilbert Cyndi, Gowan Matthew, Smith Fraser 2010 Principles and Practices of Naturopathic Botanical Medicine, Vol 1: Botanical Medicine Monographs, CCNM Press, Toronto
  4. Boon Heather, Smith Michael 2004 The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to the 50 Most Common Medicinal Herbs, Robert Rose, Toronto
  5. Hershoff Asa 2000 Homeopathic Remedies, A Quick and Easy Guide to Common Disorders and their Homeopathic Treatments, Avery Publishing Group, New York
  6. Ullman Robert, Reichenberg-Ullman Judyth 1997, Homeopathic Self-Care, the quick and easy guide for the whole family. Prima Publishing

References

Reviewed by Iva Lloyd, BScH, RPE, ND [2]


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